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Your Identity in Christ: Spirit-Filled

Ephesians 5:15-20

SERMON TEXT:

15 Consider carefully, then, how you walk, not as unwise people, but as wise people. 16 Make the most of your time, because the days are evil. 17 For this reason, do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is. 18 And do not get drunk on wine, which causes you to lose control. Instead, be filled with the Spirit 19 by speaking to one another with psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs (singing and making music with your hearts to the Lord), 20 by always giving thanks for everything to God the Father, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ. (EHV)

SERMON:

Today we’re going to see that living out our Spirit-filled identity happens in two ways: Firstly, We live out our Spirit-filled identity when we let the joy about what Christ has done for us fill our hearts and let it flow out in our actions and our worship. And secondly, we live out our Spirit-filled identity when we consider the way we walk...namely, when we seek to walk closer to God. So...It really is a bit of an interesting identity in Christ that is placed in front of us today. What does it mean to be Spirit filled? What does it not mean?

To answer that question, we’re going to start by looking at the last half of our verses today. We’ll circle back around to the others later. We’re going to begin in the middle of verse 18. And as we read these verses again, I want you to try to visualize them in your mind.

Be filled with the Spirit 19 by speaking to one another with psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs (singing and making music with your hearts to the Lord), 20 by always giving thanks for everything to God the Father, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ." What mental picture came to mind? When I think about these verses, there’s a certain energy to them. An overflowing joy. Being Spirit-filled deals with both an inward expression of joy, and an outward expression of the joy we have in Christ. And Paul has been planting in our hearts the joy we have in Christ for the last 5 and a half chapters. Christ paid for every sin of yours on the cross and now God does not hold your sin against you. Rather, you are his child. You are a member of his household. You’re a new creation. No matter what your life circumstance, all of those truths remain. Those truths are the reason for the joy and thankfulness in our hearts.

Today Paul tells us to have joy in your heart regarding what Christ has done for you. And you have permission to express that joy as well. And when we do express that joy, it encourages our brothers and sisters in Christ.

These verses have some pretty clear overtones of worship. And so we’re going to get to talk about worship today. And it’s worthwhile to spend a little time on it because worship is a bit of a sensitive topic amongst Christians today… not just in our church body but in every church body. And that’s why we’re going to approach it delicately and think about it with a level head. But before we get into it, let me tell you where we’re not going with this…I’m not about to suggest that the way we worship is in any way unpleasing to God. I’m not about to suggest that you need to express your inner joy in a way that makes you uncomfortable—the joy you have in your heart and the way you express it is pleasing to God because you are his child. But I AM going to suggest, that you shouldn’t suppress the joy and thankfulness you have in your heart when it tries to flow out. And I AM going to say that, God-willing [and this is my prayer every single day], should our churches grow, we need to be aware before the fact that as we reach out to people of other cultures and backgrounds, their outward expression of the joy in their hearts might be different than ours… and that’s OKAY.

Let me give you a few examples of what I’m talking about. My 2nd year of Seminary, I preached a couple of sermons at Garden Homes Lutheran church in Milwaukee. It’s an ethnically mixed congregation in our circles. More often than not, the music is non-german and isn’t accompanied by the organ. A whole slew of instruments are used. It’s lively. People say amen in the middle of a sermon when something resonates with them. There’s a gospel choir. And none of that is wrong. In fact it’s God pleasing. They’re living out their Spirit-filled identity, speaking God’s Word to one another, making music with their hearts and voices, and giving thanks to God.

In my third year of schooling when I was working with one of our churches in DC...There was this big white man that would come to our contemporary service. He didn’t come from a Lutheran background. He would sit towards the front. He too would say AMEN when a point resonated with him. In addition, he enjoyed holding his hands up when he really got into a song. Similar story in the WELS congregation I was in from 7th grade on...There’s a Jamaican woman. She says amen. She holds her hands up. And all of it is okay. It’s pleasing to God. They’re living out their Spirit-filled identity, speaking the Word of God to one another, making music with their hearts and voices, and giving thanks to God.

You have brothers and sisters in Christ around the world—like in Africa for example—who believe the same as you do when it comes to the doctrines of the Bible but worship very differently. I’m sure if you took just about any American WELS Lutheran and sat them in the middle of one of their services, they would think they had walked into a Pentecostal service. But that would be very very far from actually being the case. They’re confessional Lutherans who are dancing and singing and praising God…and all of it is okay. It’s all pleasing to God. They’re living out their Spirit-filled identity, speaking the Word of God to one another, making music with their hearts and voices, and giving thanks to God.

You see, as we live out our identity of being Spirit-filled Christians when it comes to worship, God is not concerned with what instrument is used. The organ can be used to praise him. The piano can be used to praise him. The guitar, the drums, stringed instruments, wind instruments, horns… they can all be used to praise him. God also does not prescribe a way in which we are to let the joy in our hearts flow out into our actions. Singing a hymn with all your might in 4 part harmony, saying amen in the middle of a sermon, holding your hands up, dancing… it can all be done to the glory of the Lord. None of these things are superior to another in God’s eyes. But here’s what God does care about… God cares about content. Verse 17 said, "Understand what the will of the Lord is."

When God’s Word is preached and taught in it’s truth and purity, it’s pleasing to Him. When we take time to ask, well what does God’s Word truly say? It’s pleasing to him. When we take time to ask, How does God’s Word apply to my life? It’s pleasing to him. And the better we know God’s Word in it’s truth and purity, the more our joy in Christ will grow. And the more that joy in our hearts grows, the more eager it will be to flow out. And remember, our goal today was not to prescribe a particular way that that joy needs flows out, but to show that it’s okay to let it flow out naturally. And in the short time I’ve been here, I have already seen the joy in your hearts flowing out. It happens both in worship, and outside of worship. It happens when we put in the effort to be a part of one another's lives. It happens when we take the time to listen to and encourage someone that is having a tough time. It happens when we are patient, kind and loving with one another. It happens when we serve one another—when we consider one another's needs before our own. It happens when we treat one another as equally valuable members of the body of Christ. It happens when we give thanks to God for everything.

So as we opened we talked about how living out our Spirit-filled identity happens in two ways: Firstly, We live out our Spirit-filled identity when we let the joy about what Christ has done for us fill our hearts and let it flow out in our actions and our worship. So we talked about that...and now we’ll close with the second way... We live out that identity when we consider the way we walk...namely, when we seek to walk closer to God and ask him for strength to help us do so.

And now we’re going to circle back around to the opening verses because they illustrate this point, "Consider carefully, then, how you walk, not as unwise people, but as wise people. 16 Make the most of your time, because the days are evil. 17 For this reason, do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is."

When Paul says, "Consider how you walk..." there’s a good chance he has the Proverbs in mind. Numerous places in Proverbs speak about the path that we walk in life. And the path we walk in life has profound implications...whether it be what Proverbs calls the way of the fool—a path leading away from the Lord, or the way of the wise—a path that walks with the Lord. In our immediate context, Paul mentioned the sin of drinking too much as one of those deeds found on the path away from the Lord. But just a few verses before today’s verses he uses a much more general term. He calls all things found in that way of foolishness "deeds of darkness." And admittedly, even as Christians, walking in the way of the wise can be a struggle. You’ve heard me refer to Romans Chapter 7 a number of times in this series—that inner struggle the Christian has between the old sinful person and the new person… That’s because a lot of Ephesians has to do with sanctification. When we’re speaking about sanctification, we’re not talking about salvation. Your salvation is complete. It was completed on the cross when Jesus paid for your sin. But now, because we are both saint and sinner, remaining on the path of the wise—walking with the Lord—will be a daily battle. That’s because our old sinful person loves to make us look over at that other path—the path of sin—and trick us into thinking that it looks like fun. It looks like the easy path to walk. And that sinful person loves to make us forget that ultimately, everything that is found on that path brings us no lasting satisfaction or fulfillment.

Walking on the path of the Lord brings lasting satisfaction and fulfillment. So how do we learn to better walk on that path of life? Paul says it in verse 17: "understand what the will of the Lord is." Walking on the path of the wise, walking with God, is wrapped up in coming to know his Word better because that is where he reveals his will to us. So it’s happening right now. It happens every week as we come and seek to more deeply understand and experience the joy we have in Christ. It happens as we come and let that joy flow out in our worship and in our interactions with one another. It happens when we take time to study his Word at home and with our brothers and sisters in Christ.

May God strengthen us to live out our identity in Christ as His Spirit-filled children. May God strengthen us to walk closer to him as we seek to better know his Word. May the joy about what Christ has done for us fill our hearts—may it flow out in our actions and our worship. Amen.



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